Monday, August 18, 2014

Where to Eat: The Summer Sunday Brunch @ Sonny's Hideaway


The Eats: Classic brunch items, with a gourmet flair


The Location: Highland Park

The Vibes: Simplistic setting, complex dishes

Good for: Nonchalantly brunching in a sophisticatedly relaxed and comfortable setting

When-To-Go: Sundays, 11 a.m. – 3 p.m.

The $ Factor: Entrees are $7–$17; Cocktails are $9-$12

The Names behind the scenes: Owner Derek Lyons, Chef Alexander Abdel-Monem

The 4-1-1: Sonny’s opened in 2013 and launched its brunch menu earlier in Spring 2014, adding a few additional items in July as well. It also has a bar program that features intricate libations and Tiki Tuesdays.

Parking Situation: Street parking on York Blvd.; nearby public parking lots in the neighborhood

I’ll Be Back…: For the Chickpea Pancakes!

Ricotta Funnel Cake, hazelnut coffee, chocolate
Citrus Custard, seasonal fruit, sesame seeds
Chickpea Pancakes, tomato, eggplant, Swiss chard, cumin, Parmesan

When I first read the entrees above, from Sonny’s Hideaway menu on the media invite I received, I blankly stared at my computer screen. The ingredients didn’t seem to make sense. What in the world was a ricotta funnel cake? Citrus custard—with sesame seeds? And chickpea pancakes? Was that correct? While I could most certainly read the words in front of me, I couldn’t even begin to imagine how what I read could all come together to be edible entrees, presented to me on a plate.

Fortunately, Chef Alexander Abdel-Monem and Owner Derek Lyons (pictured below, respectively) didn’t seem to have the same creative culinary inhibitions that I had. One sunny summer Sunday at Sonny's Hideaway, with a handful of guests present, during our brunch, Abdel-Monem explained to us that when creating the menu, he wanted to feature popular brunch items that anyone could potentially make at home (side note: there’s no way I’d be able to recreate anything I ate at Sonny’s in my kitchen). He also mentioned that growing up in Florida heavily influenced his cooking style.



After sampling about half of the brunch menu, a trend became apparent; each entrée distinctly has its own individual personality, no one dish the same—in taste, appearance or ingredients. And every entrée is as lovely to look at as it is to eat. In other words, Abdel-Monem's daring combinations work! Sonny’s also caters to everyone. There are plenty of options for the meat-lover and the vegetarian alike. There are both Sweet and Savory items, with a nice balance of light and heavier options, to satisfy all appetite sizes. The majority of the entrees incorporate some sort of fruit or vegetable, whether it’s the berry syrup with chunks of blueberries on the Brioche French Toast, the fried green tomatillos accompanying the Carnitas or the bed of fruit in the Passionfruit Custard. There are 12 entrees in total and also five sides, ranging from market greens to smoked home fries, eggs and bacon.

Here’s a look at what I sampled:

The Passionfruit Custard – More of a sauce than an actual custard, it’s generously drizzled on a bed of fruit, including blackberries, raspberries, apples, oranges, pomegranates and passionfruit. This dish gets a big plus for the diversity of fruit and for the delicateness of the sweet, subtle sauce. A perfect starter to share.



The Ricotta Fritters – Were a delight to eat. Dusted with powdered sugar, they’re crunchy on the outside and moist, fluffy and soft on the inside. I couldn’t make up my mind which sauce I liked better: the creamy chocolate, the hazelnut coffee, or a bit of both eaten at the same time.



The Chickpea Pancakes – Here’s a savory take on the traditionally sweet pancake. While the actual pancake alone has its own unique earthy flavor, it’s really the toppings it’s paired with that make this entrée so good. Whole chickpeas are mixed with poignant Swiss chard, with thin slices of Parmesan finishing it. Very filling. 



The Fried Chicken – Includes fried chicken breasts, a pan poached egg and hollandaise perched neatly atop two buttermilk biscuits. I can’t fail to mention the creamy gravy on the plate, which should definitely be sopped up with a biscuit or two – it’s divine. Don’t let it go to waste!



The Brioche French Toast – Exactly what French Toast should be: thick bread with a crunchy crust and a soft, warm center. It may seem like it’s a lot going on to have pecans, berry syrup and a cinnamon crème fraîche all covering the French Toast, but in reality, the flavors don’t overpower one another and in fact work very well together.



The Citrus Beet Salad – Is an intriguing blend of lettuce, radishes, beets, orange and goat cheese, all underneath a creamy yogurt dressing. It’s large enough to be a brunch entrée, or also a nice portion to share.



Another noteworthy mention is the Carnitas entrees. Since I don’t eat beef, I didn’t try the actual carnitas, but I did try everything else that comes with them – the delightfully tangy mix of pickled onions and peppers and fresh cilantro, the eggs with an avocado puree, and probably my favorite part, the delicious, golden-brown fried tomatillos, similar to fried tomatoes.



Just as the saying “don’t judge a book by its cover” goes, the lesson I've now learned about Sonny’s Hideaway brunch menu is clear: don’t judge an entrée by its menu description. 

See you there soon!

For more information: 


Wednesday, July 30, 2014

Where to Eat: Southern Thai Food @ Emporium Thai Cuisine



The Eats: A menu of 100+ traditional and street Southern Thai dishes

The Location: Westwood

The Vibes: Warm, intimate, casual, inviting

Good for: A relaxed dining experience with friends, dates or groups of people

When-To-Go: Monday–Thursday, 11 a.m.–10:30 p.m.; Friday–Saturday, 11 a.m.–11 p.m.; Sunday, 5–10:30 p.m.

The $ Factor: Between $10–$15 per item

The Names behind the scenes: Owner John Sungkamee; Executive Chef Gina Sungkamee

The 4-1-1: Eight of the 12 Sungkamee siblings live in the States and work in the restaurant industry, at Westwood's Emporium Thai Cuisine, L.A. Thai Town’s Jitlada and North Miami’s Happy Sushi and Thai

Parking: Limited metered street parking on Westwood Blvd. and surrounding neighborhood streets

I’ll Be Back…: For the Seafood Hor Mok!




During the summer’s recent dineL.A. Restaurant Week, I was invited to an intimate media dinner at Emporium Thai Cuisine with a small group of guests and Emporium owner, John Sungkamee, pictured above. Located in Westwood just a couple of blocks south of the main UCLA campus, the restaurant's proud claim is that it's the only one in the area serving traditional and street Southern Thai food, since opening its doors in 2000.

The evening was a highly engaging, informative experience, providing insight into the colorful textures and nuances of Southern Thai food.

Leading the night’s narrative was Sungkamee himself, weaving bits and pieces of his captivating, almost-too-hard-to-believe-it’s-true, adventure-filled life story in between dinner’s three courses and his extensively thorough explanations of the culinary customs and culture of Thailand, his native country.

It all began with Starters*, which included two of the restaurant’s most requested and well-known dishes, the Seafood Hor Mok and the Morning Glory Salad.

The Seafood Hor Mok, pictured below (and which also happened to be my personal favorite of the night), is presented in a curiously shaped yet beautifully decorated plate with eight tops covering eight holes. Underneath each top is a piping hot, small mound of baked shrimp, crab and scallop, soaked in a sweet chili and coconut sauce. This is truly a dish for the serious seafood aficionado, thanks to the generous portion of seafood in each bite!



The Morning Glory Salad is a crunchy medley of watercress and shrimp, lightly battered and tossed in a light fish sauce, lime and chili dressing. It’s one of the scores of Southern Thai dishes that's featured on the menu.



Yet a menu—or even a restaurant—wasn’t initially in Sungkamee’s plan. Born and raised in Southern Thailand and the youngest of 12 children, although he emigrated to the U.S. with his parents as a teen, Sungkamee told us that he originally had intentions to return to Thailand to launch his career after graduating from an American university. Even after Thailand’s economy took a turn for the worse, forcing him to reconsider returning, with an MBA, he ventured into Corporate America. He eventually opened Emporium, thanks to how passionate he was about Southern Thai cuisine and because of how much he had enjoyed working in restaurants part-time as a college student.

He also enjoyed sharing more with us about the three main courses we sampled: the Pad Prik King Crispy Pork, the Pad Woonsen Chicken (Glass Noodles) and a Southern Curry. In Southern Thailand, he explained that individual restaurants would typically specialize and serve only one specific dish. Fortunately, we didn’t have to travel from restaurant to restaurant that night; all three entrees were in one location!

The Pad Prik King Crispy Pork has crispy pork belly and pork rind stir fried in a dry red curry with vegetables carrots, green beans and red chili. It’s delightfully filling with a “spicy” level that can be adjusted per order.



The Pad Woonsen, or Glass Noodles—named for the soft, silver noodles in the dish—are in a clear, thin broth along with scrambled eggs and a variety of vegetables including carrots, onions, mushrooms and bean sprouts.



The Southern Curry with tofu has more bitter vegetables like bell pepper juxtaposed to the sweet, fragrant yellow curry that everything is tossed in. Sungkamee explained that the curry includes a medley of spices, and some dishes can even include up to 13 spices. He credits his sister Gina Sungkamee, Emporium’s Executive Chef, for the ingenuity that’s behind each dish, often derived from their mother’s tried and true recipes.



The night culminated with dessert, which included Fresh Mango with Sweet Sticky Rice and a pleasant surprise: coconut ice cream on sticky rice, both pictured below, respectively. Sungkamee’s childhood was filled with eating more than a few of the latter dessert during the summer. He shared with us the “best” way to eat it—letting the coconut ice cream slightly melt into the sticky rice before digging in.





The entire night took place in Emporium’s warm, inviting atmosphere of earthy, muted colors and an array of eye-catching artwork, including a creative display of partitions from Cost Plus World Market along with a Buddha statue that Sungkamee acquired during his time residing in a temple as a monk.



And yet as quickly as he'll share the success or the back story behind each dish and can rattle off a long list of celebrities who have eaten at Emporium, he was candidly transparent about the challenges he's faced. There’s trying to get the delivery system down perfectly to keep customers content and not waiting too long for their orders. Figuring out how to effectively utilize social media and how to find the most value through programs like dineL.A. Restaurant Week. And of course, there’s that always-present, ever-looming question that most restaurants face: how to get even more and more bodies coming, again and again.

But with the relaxed ambiance that serves as a comfortable backdrop to the colorful, rich Thai dishes, I’m sure it won’t be long until more people flock to Emporium in the very near future.

See you there soon!

For more information: 
WebsiteFacebook, @EmporiumThai

*Note: The Crying Tiger Beef appetizer, pictured below, was also served but I did not eat it as I do not eat beef.





Tuesday, July 15, 2014

And Where Do You Where To?: BOWL for BLOOM



While the 2014 BET Experience took over L.A. Live the last weekend in June with scores of events, concerts, exhibits and the highly anticipated BET Awards Ceremony, I attended another very important event that was quietly happening at L.A. Live, in the midst of all of the bustling action. Tucked away at Lucky Strike, BOWL for BLOOM Presented by California Community Foundation took place Saturday, June 28, hosted by actor Larenz Tate and Buffalo Wild Wings franchise owner Karim Webb.

The afternoon affair brought celebs like Ludacris, Seattle Seahawks’ Terrelle Pryor and Washington Wizards’ Trevor Ariza together to support the BLOOM program and its participants, known as BLOOMers. Created by the California Community Foundation, BLOOM—which stands for Building a Lifetime of Options and Opportunities for Men—is an L.A.-based, five-year initiative launched in 2012. It provides a variety of professional and educational opportunities for young men living in South L.A. who have been, or currently are, under L.A. County Probation Department supervision.

From left to right: Larenz Tate's brother, PCF Management Partner Edward Barnett, Larenz Tate, Karim Webb and Larenz Tate's brother. 

“BLOOM takes young men who are 14-18 years old and have had a brush with the probation department and attempts to divert them by helping them graduate high school and/or get a GED and get job placement,” Karim, pictured above, second from the right, explained to me in a brief chat we had at the event. “As importantly, we really find out what’s wanted and needed in terms of the gaps in their lives—either from a family perspective, from a mental health perspective, or in any way in which they need to be supplemented, in terms of getting what they need to be successful members of society moving forward.”

Webb went on further to share that the program already has 200 BLOOMers participating and plans to expand to 600 within the upcoming year. According to the I am BLOOM website, the goal is to serve 2,000 youth by 2017. He says that the program had a 98 percent success rate in reducing recidivism in its initial year.

I had a chance to talk with some of the BLOOMers who were at the event, including Joseph (pictured below), who had recently relocated from Oakland to Los Angeles. At 18, he had already experienced a lot, including being shot multiple times, and was now looking forward to putting his past behind him to pursue a career in the music industry. BLOOM works with other nonprofit organizations, including the Community Coalition for Substance Abuse and Treatment, L.A. Brotherhood Crusade, L.A. Urban League, Youth Justice Coalition and Youth Mentoring Connection.



“BLOOM gives us an outlet to get engaged,” said Webb. “As you can see, we’ve got young men here. We’ve got bright eyes and bright futures, and we’re committed to making sure that they are exposed to and have all the opportunity to accomplish whatever they’re willing to work for.”

Throughout the afternoon, BLOOMers, celebs and supporters bowled, networked and ate complimentary appetizers. There were about 80 guests in attendance.

Sports figures, like Trevor Ariza pictured below, took tons of photos with BLOOMers.



At one point, Ludacris joked and told BLOOMers: “One thing I know, I’m glad that y’all aren’t getting strikes in the system, but I heard that none of y’all are getting strikes on the bowling alley.”


Towards the end of the event, several key figures addressed the crowd and specifically BLOOMers, encouraging them to continue their pursuits. Speakers included Webb, Ludacris and California Community Foundation Vice President, Programs Nike Irvin, pictured below with Larenz Tate.



Larenz Tate also shared a heartfelt story about how his brother previously had a run in with the law but fortunately had the much-needed support to rebound back, similar to what the BLOOM program provides.

“We truly are appreciative,” Larenz told BLOOMers in a final address. “We have not forgotten about you; we will not forget about you, and don’t forget about each other. All I can say is I love you guys—y’all keep y’all heads up. Peace and blessings.”

For more information about BLOOM and its initiatives, visit its website.